Exhibit 08

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COMMENTS ON POLICE INTERVIEW OF PETER RISDON 11TH MARCH 1991

  1. Risdon has just been arrested attempting to retrieve a diamond from the Midland Bank using a false passport in the name of a Mr William Davis, whom police would later interview in South Africa (see Exhibits 11 & 12)
  2. Unlike William Davis, who was able to keep his mouth firmly closed, in this and in his two subsequent Police interviews, Risdon dissolves into a series of verbal enemas and in the process supplies the names and whereabouts of his colleagues, as well as revealing in some amusing passages his endless capacity for fantasy. Risdon’s interviews could not be in sharper contrast with BM’s and DG’s which will occur a few months later in July 1991. BM cracks a few jokes in his interviews and DG keeps silent. The robust approach shown by all Risdon’s colleagues, and in sharp contrast with his own collapse and cowardice, has been a source of intense frustration and shame for him over the years.
  3. Risdon would claim subsequently in a review he wrote of DG’s book in the Daily Express on 26th January 2006 (See Exhibit 48)  that he had decided to inform the police about his role in DG and BM’s heist only a month after it had occurred (ie. in or around April 1990), and as the result of “much soul searching.” This is clearly a lie. In fact, we see Risdon in these interviews being questioned by police a full year after his involvement in the DG affair (March 1991), having attempted in effect to imitate DG and BM’s heist but, through utter incompetence, having been caught at the first stage. As these interviews (Exhibits 8, 9 & 10) also make clear, he quickly explores the possibility of trading information regarding DG and BM in return for leniency (see in particular Exhibit 9 and comments thereon).
  4. Both police officers conducting the interview (CC and ME) would be among the team that would arrest,  investigate and prosecute DG and BM. Risdon would subsequently claim that no deals were done with the police in return for his turning informer and that his presence in the Midland Bank attempting to retrieve a diamond that he had had insured for hundreds of thousands of pounds using a false passport had been entirely innocent, as had been his role in the DG affair (which he had thought had been merely part of a “25,000 book-keeping exercise”).
  5. It is unlikely that any intelligent person would fall for what have to rank among the most ridiculous series of excuses for involvement in criminal activity in the history of law-breaking.
  6. The coincidences are too great to believe, among which are:
    • If Risdon had been ‘shocked’ to learn that he had not in fact been involved in a “book keeping exercise” but had unwittingly taken part in an armed robbery of precious gemstones and a subsequent false insurance claim, then what on earth is he doing exactly one year later walking into a bank with a false passport attempting to retrieve a diamond that he had had insured for a large sum of money?
      Coincidence? We’ll let the reader judge.
    • And if Risdon had been so ‘shocked’ then why is it that he waited a full year, coincidentally until the point he is arrested red-handed attempting to commit an insurance sting, before informing on DG and BM instead of going immediately to the police?
    • The same team that arrested Risdon is the very team that would investigate DG and BM.
    • The letter from the Crown Prosecution Service to DG and BM’s lawyers (See Exhibit 7) makes clear that all charges against Risdon relating to his attempted diamond insurance fraud were dropped within days of his providing a statement to police against DG and BM. Coincidence?
    • The police officers interviewing Peter Risdon in this series of interviews make clear on several occasions what their suspicions are.
    • Likewise, the police officer in charge of the UK side of the investigation into DG and BM makes clear what the police thought Risdon’s real purpose in the Midland Bank had been when he interviews Risdon’s accomplice (See Exhibit 12). Was this officer lying?
    • The police officer in charge of the US side of the investigation likewise makes equally clear the circumstances involving Risdon’s arrest and subsequent turning police informer (See Exhibit 1). Was this officer also lying?
  7. Some 13 years after this interview with the police, in 2004, Risdon will be caught lying yet again, when he will write in a review of DG’s book on Amazon.com, using the pseudonym of ‘Unforgiven’ (see Exhibit 49) that, inter alia, “the man (Risdon) wasn’t even charged with any offences.” 
  8. At the bottom of page 4 and the top of page 5, Risdon denies having ever before seen the package containing the diamond that he had attempted to retrieve from the Midland Bank. As the evidence demonstrates, this is patently untrue. Not only had Risdon ‘seen’ the package in question and knew precisely what it was that he was trying to retrieve from the bank, but he and his South African co-conspirator had had it insured for a very large sum of money (see Exhibits 26-29 & 33-36), after he had taken part one year earlier in DG and BM’s New York heist. Coincidence? Risdon insults everyone’s intelligence if he imagines that people will be unable to work out his plan within a matter of seconds.

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